BodyFit

What to do if you have a sporting injury?

Having had my fair share of  sporting injuries and accidents over the years there have been many tried and tested therapies to help alleviate the pain.

Quite often out of desperation, there have been many wacky and weird tales to tell but I think it’s something you have to go through personally to find out what works best in each situation.

I’m not going to preach what the best way is to go about seeking the right type of treatment but if you do have an injury from sport then here are some of the preventive or corrective healing techniques you could consider


One of my personal favourite is osteopathy, which is considered an alternative therapy that’s not always based on science.  It complements mainstream medicine with soft tissue work, stretching, manipulation of the joints and muscles to promote mobility, self healing and the body’s balance.  I’ve had success with lower back problems, frozen shoulder and bringing my body back into a feeling of balance. If you have any actual disc problem such as a prolapsed disc then this is probably not the way to go.


Physiotherapy includes a wide range of manual therapies, exercise rehab programs, electrotherapy.  It’s your first port of call if your coming back from surgery being it musculoskeletal, cardiothoracic or neurological as they will give you a full step by step program for the retraining of muscles.


Like osteopath’s, physios aim to treat and address the factors that contribute to the cause and lessen the risk of injury happening again. ie lower back pain could be coming from tight hamstrings or hips.


By using adjustments chiropractors  view all the joints, surrounding muscles and nerves as a potential sources of the problem. The body is viewed as a whole and all the parts interact.  In particular the spine is a point of focus as nerves travel from here to all parts of the body and internal organs


Everyone has a different opinion on acupuncture  but personally it has been a winner. Yes, it may a psychosomatic response but never the less it has helped me for back pain, shoulder stiffness and sinus congestion.  The theory is the body responds to the needles by increasing the flow of oxygenated blood to the injured area which speeds up the healing process. This is all complimentary to other forms of managed rehab and usually takes a few visits before you’ll see results.


Who doesn’t love a good sports massage ? It can hurt so much but be oh so good!  The first thing I do if I have a stiffness or sore muscles is visit my masseur.  Usually most stiffness or muscle soreness can be rubbed out but if not any good masseur can track it back to other working muscles that are being overworked or strained.


I really don’t think you can expect a sporting injury to heal without at least having a massage first. Trigger point therapy is awesome  which palpitates hyperirritable spots of taut bands in muscle fibres which substantially lessens the pain associated with tight muscles.


Of course it’s always advisable to see a doctor first with any injury who can then can help you make the decision of who to refer you to.


To help prevent injuries, athletes should take the following precautions:

+ Don’t be a “weekend warrior,” packing a week’s worth of activity into a day or two. Try to maintain a moderate level of activity throughout the week.

+ Learn to do your sport right. Using proper form can reduce your risk of “overuse” injuries such as tendinitis and stress fractures.

+ Remember safety gear. Depending on the sport, this may mean knee or wrist pads or a helmet.

+ Accept your body’s limits. You may not be able to perform at the same level you did 10 or 20 years ago. Modify activities as necessary.

+ Increase your exercise level gradually.

+ Strive for a total body workout of cardiovascular, strength training, and flexibility exercises. Cross-training reduces injury while promoting total fitness.

Who do you turn to first when your injured? Why?

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